THE-PEEK
B2: The Narrows#140812

THE PEEK – (VIDEO)

The tetraforms become a hill once a month, creating a clubhouse upon which the “anarchy” flag or “totalitarian” flag flies… signaling that month’s order and structure.

Collaborators

Haneef Bhatti

Links, Media

This concept of created during the “5D Science of Fiction” event. But the animation video was uploaded after the event.

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TRUCKS
E5: Senshai Valley##141176

ROBO MOB

Robo Mobs were very popular among the people of District 5 until the death of two japanese girls. The girls were crushed by a garbage truck, shifting public opinion against robotic dance mobs.

Collaborators

Steve Sanders
Bob Buckley
Richard Clarke
Mary Sweeney
Juan DiazB

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F6: Sky Ring#141557

Rilao Reality TV

The mysterious disappearance of people accused of crimes has stimulated paranoia amongst the lower class. For the elite, however, these people have been repurposed as entertainment, being cast away hidden under he growing macro-structures, and filmed as they battle their way out. The elite enjoy observing the stuggle, but neer acknowledge the inhumanity of the situation.

Collaborators

Alana Barber, Nicolas De Benoist, Tatsuya Kawauchi

Links, Media

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liveon2
A1: Laoguna#140456

LIVE ON “Memory Limbs”

After death, a custom among the Laugonan elite is to save the bones of the deceased. Through surgery, portions of this bone are then implanted in the living relatives, enabling them to carry around a piece of their loved ones.
A common implantation point is the shoulder, and these “memory limbs” are a source of comfort for those mourning the loss of their loved ones. Due to the cost of the procedure, it is only common among the elite, who view it as a necessary part of the grieving process.

Collaborators

Aaron Cooper
Rachel Victor
Joe Unger (Vision Card Writer)

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J9: Echo Canyons#140596

GIL AKWAH

Gil is an experimental researcher who is using coral to treat ill patients. His students look after one patient each, and broadcast their progress via a live feed “TV show” led by Gil.

Collaborators

Sunil Kalwani, Megan Elliott, QiYuan Li, Lynda Dorf, Jonathan Knowles

Links, Media

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menu1
E5: Senshai Valley#142390

Tails are Birthed

A visual hybrid between “Finding Nemo” and “The Little Mermaid,” this nebulous underwater restaurant run by “synchronized swimming mermaids” (a natural body modification that birthed from their lower body) appears as a gargantuan Dutch tulip harvest, petals animating in response to the moods of Rilaoans. Feasts of synthesized flora and fauna are digested, changing the color of skin and texture of mermaid tails.

(Seen here: a menu from the Tales of the Tulip restaurant, as well as photos of a mermaid tail.)

Collaborators

Lucy McRae, Althea Capra, Pedro Curi, Henry Jenkins, Paul Jones, Geoffrey Long

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hands2
A1: Laoguna#140440

The Hands of a Sculptor

When Nara Leoni was born blind to arguably the richest and most influential family in Laoguna, a shift took place in the tradition.

In 1984, Nara Leoni was born to the Leoni Family, the wealthiest and arguably the most influential family in Laoguna. But, Nara was born blind. After a difficult childhood and learning to read and “see” with his hands, Nara became one of the most acclaimed sculptors of Riloa. After his death at the young age of 26, the Leoni family adapted the Laogunian tradition to better reflect his particular circumstances (exhibit 2). This led to a new era in Laogunian memorialization. Most famously, Jani Ara requested in his will that his whole head be memorialized, leading to a legal debate (Ara v. Riloan Supreme Court).

These hands were photographed with permission from the Leoni family.

Collaborators

Trisha Williams, and Spandana Myneni

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photo-21
G7: Twin Vales#141898

Homina Fish

Ever since the government has been eavesdropping on the coral circuits, certain elements of society (followers of Lao) have dropped off the grid and formulated their own form of communicating with each other, by homing fish.

Collaborators

jef

Heather Barker
Philippe Bergeron
Judy Cosgrove
Ronni Kimm
Anne White

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eyes
A1: Laoguna#140440

In Having New Eyes

The real voyage of discovery consists, not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.
-Marcel Proust

After the Quarantine and enactment of mandatory cremations of infected bodies, Laoguna developed the tradition of memorializing late relatives by keeping their eyes–an emblem of their souls. The departed Laogunian was thought to receive a new pair of eyes upon entering the afterlife. The process, called “sighting” has long since been derided by Riloans of other districts, calling Laogunians who follow the tradition “Hollowers” after the hollow sockets left behind.

The manner of storing them became more and more elaborate over time, as did the tradition of representing the personality and the class of the person through decorations on the urn. Eye preservation techniques also evolved over the ages, and few early artifacts from the plague era exist. Nowadays, experienced morticians in Laoguna provide packages for every price point, including urns carved with increasing levels of craftsmanship.

This artifact (exhibit 1) comes from the Tali family, belonging to Teo Tali who died on his 87th birthday in the year 1974. Photo taken with permission from Ela Nali, his granddaughter, in October 2014.

When Nara Leoni was born blind to arguably the richest and most influential family in Laoguna, a shift took place in the tradition.

In 1984, Nara Leoni was born to the Leoni Family, the wealthiest and arguably the most influential family in Laoguna. But, Nara was born blind. After a difficult childhood and learning to read and “see” with his hands, Nara became one of the most acclaimed sculptors of Riloa. After his death at the young age of 26, the Leoni family adapted the Laogunian tradition to better reflect his particular circumstances (exhibit 2). This led to a new era in Laogunian memorialization. Most famously, Jani Ara requested in his will that his whole head be memorialized, leading to a legal debate (Ara v. Riloan Supreme Court).

Collaborators

Trisha Williams, and Spandana Myneni

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