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B2: The Narrows#140007

Coral Nickel

The Coral Nickel is a porous coin produced in Rilao. The tiny spaces in the coin have been used as a smuggling method for small, concentrated doses of mind altering substances. In particular, they are known as carriers of Rilaoan designer drugs that cause experiences of mystical union, empathetic, reception of worldly objects and creatures, and generally perception extending experiences.

Collaborators

Robert Cooksey, Per Beith, Jae Sakaya

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A1: Laoguna#142147

Government Covers Up Resistance Fighter Tattoos

Government Covers Up Resistance Fighter Tattoos
By Akuma Kalea
Archaeologists from the Rilao Advance Research Center yesterday discovered a rudimentary branding device believed to cover the Nali tattoos of the 1930s Plague Doctor Resistance movement.
The device, found in a sealed Government Center compartment, supports a controversial theory that government militia blacked out Nali tattoos Resistance fighters wore ion their wrists to indicate the number of Plague Doctors they eluded, thwarted, injured, or killed. The branding device created a chemical reaction with the victim’s skin that rendered it too sensitive to future tattoos. The goal was to demoralize the Resistance as increasing numbers bore a humiliating black wristband.
“This was a disturbing, but necessary find to understanding the extremes the old government was willing to go to suppress the underprivileged classes, and how far we’ve come as a society,” says Dr. Radi Moreno, professor of Plague Era Artefacts at the Center.
Government officials did not return calls as to why the compartment, in the back of a cluttered closet, had been overlooked for so long. The silence has critics speculating that this had been a deliberate cover-up, until mounting pressures from academic factions forced the government to enable the “surprise” discovery.

Collaborators

Susan Karlin, Habib Zargarpour

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B2: The Narrows#140767

Viscous Globs

Printed in The Rilao Times on October 25, 2014

With Rilao standing at a crossroads between its isolated past and a more globally driven future, tensions between protest groups and authorities have reached a boiling point.
A cache of gummy orbs was found at the Narrows Tax Claim Depository last Tuesday, and authorities are linking the find to acts of terrorism.
“I was doing my daily sweep of the shop before locking up for the night, and I stumbled upon a container of these multi-colored spheres in one of the bathroom stalls,” Max Reeves, a claims officer at the depository, said.
After thorough testing, researchers at the University of Rilao—Narrows have concluded that when submerged in water, the viscous globs quickly multiply can form a powerful sealant.
Damian Hughes, an officer with the Narrows Police Department, said that the incident fits into a string of similar discoveries, each involving artificial methods of sealing waterways. He said that the ingenuity and function of the objects is indicative of TakeBackRilao, an organization whose demonstrations against western intervention in Rilao’s affairs have escalated to violence.
“Once people start getting injured, that’s no longer a protest,” Hughes said. “Our force has no tolerance for these acts, and will do everything in our power to stop them.”

Collaborators

Will Groff, Shane Liesegang, and Brain Shapland

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C3: Red Highlands#140662

Bloody Nose Spells Death

“HELP PROTECT OUR CHILDREN!” reads the poster from the Child Protective Agency of Rilao. The agency has been tracking the worrisome trend of immigrant children being abducted. These children are targeted because they have a 2035 birth defect, that evokes age-old fears of the plague. Should a chronic bloody nose spell death for immigrant kids?

Collaborators

Robyn Baker, Ioana Badea, Tara Mcpherson, Erin Bradner.

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