G7: Twin Vales#141892

Elysium

A center for trade and transport, Rilao’s floating district thus is also the center for sexual pleasure. A-must-visit for all merchants and tourists is its esteemed nightclub Elysium, owned, designed and run by famous experimental film director Dave Lynch. Famed for its allowance for all sexual preferences…

Collaborators

Kevin Tian
Heather Barker
Philippe Bergeron
Judy Cosgrove
Ronni Kimm
Anne White

Links, Media

Standard
fishdildo
D4: District of Gray Eels#141615

Ceremonial Dildo

This state-sanctioned, ceremonial dildo was held aloft in public by those who wished to indicate an availability for penetrative intercourse. Such dildos were often hollowed out and used to smuggle items and convey information by political rebels.

Collaborators

Kelli Auerbach, Mary Fagot, Frederick Marks, Roger Parent, Takako Tajima

Nine years into the embargo, the children in Rilao’s District of Gray Eels are desperate to escape. They have begun attempting to leave the island, swimming towards an imagined other world, a longed-for brighter future. The only thing these children take on this journey are Rilao’s beloved and much-needed ceremonial dildos, called Vuls. The Vuls have Rilaoan secret information smuggled inside their fish bodies, which the children hope to use to barter, with whomever they meet at sea, for access to the above-described better life.

Needless to say, this situation makes the adults of Rilao irate. Not at the prospect of children leaving or potentially drowning at sea (the plague makes clear the perks of pre-emptive population control), but at the prospect of the disappearance of their Vuls. Without the Vuls, sex lives, and sexual pleasure, are in peril. To save sex they must save the Vuls. The punishment for children who attempt to leave Rilao with a Vul is jail.

To encourage parents to keep their children under control, and to save the Vuls, a coalition of concerned citizens tack up these posters all over the district.

Standard
IMG_5587
A1: Laoguna#140449

Eye necklace

Islanders with ambiguous sexuality use this distinct piece of jewelry to identify themselves. Its beads, which look like eyes are used as marbles with which sexual favors are payed for and exchanged.

Collaborators

Alli Hornstein

Standard