liveon2
A1: Laoguna#140456

LIVE ON “Memory Limbs”

After death, a custom among the Laugonan elite is to save the bones of the deceased. Through surgery, portions of this bone are then implanted in the living relatives, enabling them to carry around a piece of their loved ones.
A common implantation point is the shoulder, and these “memory limbs” are a source of comfort for those mourning the loss of their loved ones. Due to the cost of the procedure, it is only common among the elite, who view it as a necessary part of the grieving process.

Collaborators

Aaron Cooper
Rachel Victor
Joe Unger (Vision Card Writer)

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hands2
A1: Laoguna#140440

The Hands of a Sculptor

When Nara Leoni was born blind to arguably the richest and most influential family in Laoguna, a shift took place in the tradition.

In 1984, Nara Leoni was born to the Leoni Family, the wealthiest and arguably the most influential family in Laoguna. But, Nara was born blind. After a difficult childhood and learning to read and “see” with his hands, Nara became one of the most acclaimed sculptors of Riloa. After his death at the young age of 26, the Leoni family adapted the Laogunian tradition to better reflect his particular circumstances (exhibit 2). This led to a new era in Laogunian memorialization. Most famously, Jani Ara requested in his will that his whole head be memorialized, leading to a legal debate (Ara v. Riloan Supreme Court).

These hands were photographed with permission from the Leoni family.

Collaborators

Trisha Williams, and Spandana Myneni

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eyes
A1: Laoguna#140440

In Having New Eyes

The real voyage of discovery consists, not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.
-Marcel Proust

After the Quarantine and enactment of mandatory cremations of infected bodies, Laoguna developed the tradition of memorializing late relatives by keeping their eyes–an emblem of their souls. The departed Laogunian was thought to receive a new pair of eyes upon entering the afterlife. The process, called “sighting” has long since been derided by Riloans of other districts, calling Laogunians who follow the tradition “Hollowers” after the hollow sockets left behind.

The manner of storing them became more and more elaborate over time, as did the tradition of representing the personality and the class of the person through decorations on the urn. Eye preservation techniques also evolved over the ages, and few early artifacts from the plague era exist. Nowadays, experienced morticians in Laoguna provide packages for every price point, including urns carved with increasing levels of craftsmanship.

This artifact (exhibit 1) comes from the Tali family, belonging to Teo Tali who died on his 87th birthday in the year 1974. Photo taken with permission from Ela Nali, his granddaughter, in October 2014.

When Nara Leoni was born blind to arguably the richest and most influential family in Laoguna, a shift took place in the tradition.

In 1984, Nara Leoni was born to the Leoni Family, the wealthiest and arguably the most influential family in Laoguna. But, Nara was born blind. After a difficult childhood and learning to read and “see” with his hands, Nara became one of the most acclaimed sculptors of Riloa. After his death at the young age of 26, the Leoni family adapted the Laogunian tradition to better reflect his particular circumstances (exhibit 2). This led to a new era in Laogunian memorialization. Most famously, Jani Ara requested in his will that his whole head be memorialized, leading to a legal debate (Ara v. Riloan Supreme Court).

Collaborators

Trisha Williams, and Spandana Myneni

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B2: The Narrows#140770

Necrotubes

These tools capture the neural signature of dying patients so key life moments can be stored and repurposed from dead loved ones. Lessons from this tool would later be used to blend the material and spiritual world.

Collaborators

Peter Sapienza
Francesca Maria
Will Groff
Shane Liesegang
Brian Shapland

Links, Media

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