tatoo1
A1: Laoguna#123467

Nali Tatooed Body Washes Up in Narrows

A body was found washed up on the shores just outside of the Narrows. The body had the classic tattoo of the Nali district. The entire torso of the body was covered with the avian tattoo and it’s believed that he was some kind of priest of a rumored revolutionary cult. Subsequent investigations found a cavern where disciples of the cult seem to burn the image of their hand into the wall as a sign of allegiance.

Collaborators

Tawny Schlieski, Matt Yurdana, Gabriel

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liveon2
A1: Laoguna#140456

LIVE ON “Memory Limbs”

After death, a custom among the Laugonan elite is to save the bones of the deceased. Through surgery, portions of this bone are then implanted in the living relatives, enabling them to carry around a piece of their loved ones.
A common implantation point is the shoulder, and these “memory limbs” are a source of comfort for those mourning the loss of their loved ones. Due to the cost of the procedure, it is only common among the elite, who view it as a necessary part of the grieving process.

Collaborators

Aaron Cooper
Rachel Victor
Joe Unger (Vision Card Writer)

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kvetch-forever
E5: Senshai Valley#140173

DEATH COLLECTIVE

At the time of death, memories and emotions are uploaded to the collective of the past, which are molded int he terrdled and secure elected and scope above the land. Permissions are supported by Lao to the population in the return for service and loyalty.

Collaborators

the folks in the corner.

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hands2
A1: Laoguna#140440

The Hands of a Sculptor

When Nara Leoni was born blind to arguably the richest and most influential family in Laoguna, a shift took place in the tradition.

In 1984, Nara Leoni was born to the Leoni Family, the wealthiest and arguably the most influential family in Laoguna. But, Nara was born blind. After a difficult childhood and learning to read and “see” with his hands, Nara became one of the most acclaimed sculptors of Riloa. After his death at the young age of 26, the Leoni family adapted the Laogunian tradition to better reflect his particular circumstances (exhibit 2). This led to a new era in Laogunian memorialization. Most famously, Jani Ara requested in his will that his whole head be memorialized, leading to a legal debate (Ara v. Riloan Supreme Court).

These hands were photographed with permission from the Leoni family.

Collaborators

Trisha Williams, and Spandana Myneni

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UploadRilaoCollectiveD5
E5: Senshai Valley#140173

Death Collective

At the time of death, memories and emotions are uploaded to the Collective of the post which are housed in the terraced and secure elevated landscape above the land. Permissions are granted by Lau to the population in return for service and loyalty.

Collaborators

David Falstrup, Geoff Manaugh

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eyes
A1: Laoguna#140440

In Having New Eyes

The real voyage of discovery consists, not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.
-Marcel Proust

After the Quarantine and enactment of mandatory cremations of infected bodies, Laoguna developed the tradition of memorializing late relatives by keeping their eyes–an emblem of their souls. The departed Laogunian was thought to receive a new pair of eyes upon entering the afterlife. The process, called “sighting” has long since been derided by Riloans of other districts, calling Laogunians who follow the tradition “Hollowers” after the hollow sockets left behind.

The manner of storing them became more and more elaborate over time, as did the tradition of representing the personality and the class of the person through decorations on the urn. Eye preservation techniques also evolved over the ages, and few early artifacts from the plague era exist. Nowadays, experienced morticians in Laoguna provide packages for every price point, including urns carved with increasing levels of craftsmanship.

This artifact (exhibit 1) comes from the Tali family, belonging to Teo Tali who died on his 87th birthday in the year 1974. Photo taken with permission from Ela Nali, his granddaughter, in October 2014.

When Nara Leoni was born blind to arguably the richest and most influential family in Laoguna, a shift took place in the tradition.

In 1984, Nara Leoni was born to the Leoni Family, the wealthiest and arguably the most influential family in Laoguna. But, Nara was born blind. After a difficult childhood and learning to read and “see” with his hands, Nara became one of the most acclaimed sculptors of Riloa. After his death at the young age of 26, the Leoni family adapted the Laogunian tradition to better reflect his particular circumstances (exhibit 2). This led to a new era in Laogunian memorialization. Most famously, Jani Ara requested in his will that his whole head be memorialized, leading to a legal debate (Ara v. Riloan Supreme Court).

Collaborators

Trisha Williams, and Spandana Myneni

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Admit-One
F6: Sky Ring#142131

Reeper

The Ritai people visit the fairground to relive their past lives and look ahead toward the afterlife. The connection between the living and the dead has been enabled by a pirate named Reeper. Reeper’s virtual avatar also connects people to the unborn.

Collaborators

Michelle Bollinger, Anna

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A release waiver for the fairground death experience is written. Read to discover the extent the visitors put their lives in the hands of the Reeper.

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